Being creative – good rules

It’s been a while since I’ve visited Hugh MacLeod’s blog gapingvoid. I’ve been off in other directions recently. But I was back again today and it confirmed my feeling that it’s one of the best blogs on the web, especially from the point of view of business, marketing, creativity and so on.

And on the subject of creativity, you really should have a look at his How to be creative. It’s a list of rules and they are bang on the money. He has 31 rules, but these are my favourites:

1. Ignore everybody.
5. You are responsible for your own experience.
6. Everyone is born creative; everyone is given a box of crayons in kindergarten.
8. Companies that squelch creativity can no longer compete with companies that champion creativity.
10. The more talented somebody is, the less they need the props.
11. Don’t try to stand out from the crowd; avoid crowds altogether.
17. Merit can be bought. Passion can’t.
19. Sing in your own voice.
20. The choice of media is irrelevant.
28. Power is never given. Power is taken.

Have a look for yourself. And be sure to see his riffs on each one further down the page.

About Bill Wren

Writer, editor, social media practitioner and observer of how and where people connect and engage online.

4 Responses to Being creative – good rules

  1. Robyn says:

    Bill, thanks for passing on some great ideas about how to be creative. One of the biggest squelchers I know is standardization. We’re simply not all alike. I’ve always thought of myself as unconventional. You have to be strong though to take different approaches.

  2. Robyn says:

    Bill, thanks for passing on some great ideas about how to be creative. One of the biggest squelchers I know is standardization. We’re simply not all alike. I’ve always thought of myself as unconventional. You have to be strong though to take different approaches.

  3. Bill says:

    Sometimes standardization can help in terms of effectiveness and efficiency. But there are also times when you have to throw it out the door to achieve the result you want. The trick, I suppose, is to know when and where to standardize and when and where to be unconventional.

    Some people like standarization because it’s easy. Unfortunately, sometimes it’s also wrong and the fastest route to failure.

  4. Bill says:

    Sometimes standardization can help in terms of effectiveness and efficiency. But there are also times when you have to throw it out the door to achieve the result you want. The trick, I suppose, is to know when and where to standardize and when and where to be unconventional.

    Some people like standarization because it’s easy. Unfortunately, sometimes it’s also wrong and the fastest route to failure.

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